Verbal Gaslighting

From Miriam Webster online:

Definition of stonewall

intransitive verb

1 : chiefly British : to engage in obstructive parliamentary debate or delaying tactics

2 : to be uncooperative, obstructive, or evasive


transitive verb

: to refuse to comply or cooperate with


stone wall

noun

Definition of stone wall

1 : a fence made of stones especially : one built of rough stones without mortar to enclose a field

2 : an immovable block or obstruction (as in public affairs)


Did You Know?

The earliest English stonewalls were literal; they were walls made from stone. Because a stone wall can be difficult to surmount, English speakers began using stonewall figuratively for things or people who either were persistent and enduring or who presented an obstacle as formidable as a stone wall. (Those figurative senses earned American Confederate Civil War General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson his nickname.) Then, in the late 1800s, cricket players began using stonewall as a verb in reference to a batter’s defensive blocking of balls. Around the same time, stonewall found its way into political slang as a synonym of filibuster. There is also a chiefly British sense of “to engage in obstructive parliamentary debate or delaying tactics.”

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